colonialcomics:

Next up is a story that’s pretty special to me, “The Press’s Widow: Elizabeth Glover” by Erika Swyler and Noel Tuazon. Early on in this project I was researching the printing industry in colonial New England and came across the story of Elizabeth Glover, the woman who brought the first printing press to New England. That’s essentially all I knew about her, and I asked Erika Swyler if she was up to the task of finding more information. 
I met Erika via tumblr, when she asked me if I could look over a short story she wrote about the ups and downs of a woman’s life over 84 years. I loved it and asked her to review the story that became The Little Particle That Could. 
Erika did a great job filling in the seemingly monumental gaps in Elizabeth Glover’s life. She discovered that Glover came over with her husband, who died on the trip, leaving her with a collection of kids, two debtors, and a printing press. The story ended up touching upon a lot of aspects of colonial life, including the difficulties women faced in opening and running businesses, the need to increase social stature by through marriage, the importance of the printed word, the early days of Harvard University, and the printing of the first book in the America, the Bay Psalm Book, a risky venture made when money was tight and which was riddled with errors. An original copy of the Bay Psalm Book recently sold at auction for $14-million. 
I paired her up with Noel Tuazon, who I’ve worked with many times. He was the illustrator of Elk’s Run, a book I edited, and he contributed to Postcards: True Stories That Never Happened. Also, he was the artist on the previously mentioned The Little Particle That Could. 
Together, they turned in a great story about a relatively unknown person who lived a truly remarkable life - which is really what this book is about, at the end of the day.
Colonial Comics: New England, 1620-1750 will be released in October from Fulcrum Books. You can pre-order it on Amazon now.
Previous Design Posts:
Cover Process
Intro Pages
Previous Story Posts:
Harried Out The Land by Nick Bunker, Chris Piers, Jason Axtell, and Jason Hanley.
Thomas Morton, Merry Mount’s Lord of Misrule by E.J. Barnes.
Troublesome Sows by Virginia DeJohn Anderson and Mike Sgier
Garden in the Wilderness by Matt Boehm and Ellen T. Crenshaw
The Trial of Anne Hutchinson by Alexander Danner and Matt Rawson

I’ve mentioned it before, but this project is special to me. I absolutely love rooting around in history, trying to fill the gaps texts inevitably leave. It’s not uncommon for texts to write “around” women as opposed to fleshing out their daily lives. It was an absolute privilege to play even the smallest part in changing that for Elizabeth Glover.
Noel’s art is… yes. Yes is what happens when I run out of superlatives.
Jason is also being quite kind to me. We did connect on tumblr and had a great time playing around with each other’s writing, but I suspect this partnership had an awful lot to do with the fact that I’m something of a comic nerd (understatement) and am prone to writing long diatribes about the history of typing. I may or may not have hit on his typewriter. I do not recommend this as a strategy for getting work, by the way. His typewriter is really just that attractive.
But please, do give this a look when you can. It’s an incredibly cool project as a whole, and it’s also probably the only time I’ll ever see my name on the same page as Sarah Vowell’s.
It’s available for pre-order here.
Thanks!

colonialcomics:

Next up is a story that’s pretty special to me, “The Press’s Widow: Elizabeth Glover” by Erika Swyler and Noel Tuazon. Early on in this project I was researching the printing industry in colonial New England and came across the story of Elizabeth Glover, the woman who brought the first printing press to New England. That’s essentially all I knew about her, and I asked Erika Swyler if she was up to the task of finding more information. 

I met Erika via tumblr, when she asked me if I could look over a short story she wrote about the ups and downs of a woman’s life over 84 years. I loved it and asked her to review the story that became The Little Particle That Could

Erika did a great job filling in the seemingly monumental gaps in Elizabeth Glover’s life. She discovered that Glover came over with her husband, who died on the trip, leaving her with a collection of kids, two debtors, and a printing press. The story ended up touching upon a lot of aspects of colonial life, including the difficulties women faced in opening and running businesses, the need to increase social stature by through marriage, the importance of the printed word, the early days of Harvard University, and the printing of the first book in the America, the Bay Psalm Book, a risky venture made when money was tight and which was riddled with errors. An original copy of the Bay Psalm Book recently sold at auction for $14-million. 

I paired her up with Noel Tuazon, who I’ve worked with many times. He was the illustrator of Elk’s Run, a book I edited, and he contributed to Postcards: True Stories That Never Happened. Also, he was the artist on the previously mentioned The Little Particle That Could

Together, they turned in a great story about a relatively unknown person who lived a truly remarkable life - which is really what this book is about, at the end of the day.

Colonial Comics: New England, 1620-1750 will be released in October from Fulcrum Books. You can pre-order it on Amazon now.

Previous Design Posts:

Previous Story Posts:

I’ve mentioned it before, but this project is special to me. I absolutely love rooting around in history, trying to fill the gaps texts inevitably leave. It’s not uncommon for texts to write “around” women as opposed to fleshing out their daily lives. It was an absolute privilege to play even the smallest part in changing that for Elizabeth Glover.

Noel’s art is… yes. Yes is what happens when I run out of superlatives.

Jason is also being quite kind to me. We did connect on tumblr and had a great time playing around with each other’s writing, but I suspect this partnership had an awful lot to do with the fact that I’m something of a comic nerd (understatement) and am prone to writing long diatribes about the history of typing. I may or may not have hit on his typewriter. I do not recommend this as a strategy for getting work, by the way. His typewriter is really just that attractive.

But please, do give this a look when you can. It’s an incredibly cool project as a whole, and it’s also probably the only time I’ll ever see my name on the same page as Sarah Vowell’s.

It’s available for pre-order here.

Thanks!

evan-morgan-williams replied to your post: I can still make a tiny rage fist, so …

I broke my wrist last summer (at Tin House Writers Workshop!), and I posted a similar pic.

It appears houses in general are dangerous! Though techincally yours counts as an on the job injury, no? Alas, this is a wimpy injury in the form of tendinitis brought about by hammering, sawing, nailing, spackling, sanding, painting, mowing, raking, hedge clipping, lifting heavy objects, and all sorts of other things that would allow me to qualify for the Wife Carrying Competition, were I my own wife. Oh, and typing. In theory I’m just on 6 weeks of “take it easy and don’t do anything stupid.”

Clearly my doctor doesn’t know me at all.

I bought jelly shoes for $20 and they’re everything I could have ever wanted them to be.  No, they *are* everything. These shoes make me question other life decisions and why everything else hasn’t been this good.  These $20 jelly shoes are so good they’ve caused an existential crisis. #jellyshoes #existentialcrisis

I bought jelly shoes for $20 and they’re everything I could have ever wanted them to be. No, they *are* everything. These shoes make me question other life decisions and why everything else hasn’t been this good. These $20 jelly shoes are so good they’ve caused an existential crisis. #jellyshoes #existentialcrisis

I have so many feelings about this picture. Yes, I’m the idiot who waxes nostalgic about the card catalog.
One day I’ll own one and catalog everything—shoes, baking ingredients, fights we’ve had about the dishes.
While I love the immediacy of a good internet search, nothing compares to the tactile joy of discovery that came with the card catalog.
Hold me. Hold me while I cry about card catalogs.

I have so many feelings about this picture. Yes, I’m the idiot who waxes nostalgic about the card catalog.

One day I’ll own one and catalog everything—shoes, baking ingredients, fights we’ve had about the dishes.

While I love the immediacy of a good internet search, nothing compares to the tactile joy of discovery that came with the card catalog.

Hold me. Hold me while I cry about card catalogs.

missveryvery:

What You Don’t Know About Beauty and the Beast:
Some backstory: due to this little discussion, I was considering writing a continuation/expansion of Beauty and the Beast. I read up on it and found out everything I thought I knew about it was wrong.
-It was created by one, singular, female author in 1740: Madame Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve
-It is not a retelling of a pervasive folklore like Perrault’s Cinderella, for example. It was influenced by folklore but is an original story and is very “post” the fairy tales you might be familiar with. The story is also influenced by women who gathered together and told each other revisions of fairy tales in Parisian salons.
-It’s over 100 pages long
-Though written simply and in a straightforward manner, the characters have personalities and are much more complex in their emotions than a normal folkloric tale. They behave in a diverse and fairly realistic manner to their situations. The Beast’s mother in particular is a complex woman, protective of her son and a capable military leader but not progressive in her attitude towards marrying below your station.
-Women are overwhelmingly the masters of the plot and outnumber the men in number and priority.
Female players include:

Belle/Beauty


A nice Fairy


A jerk Fairy (called Mother of the Seasons)


The Queen of the Fairies


A Fairy-who-is-a-Queen (these are different)


A Queen/the Beast’s mother


Belle’s shallow (though fairly realistically so) sisters who are treated as a collective

-It contains considerable world-building. Fairy language, Fairy law, Fairy influence over monarchies, Fairy hierarchy, Fairy magic are all things she depicts. (eat your heart out, Tolkien fans).
-The curse is broken halfway through the book. The rest is devoted to comments on class, monarchy, marrying for love vs. status, appropriate conditions for love, and marrying below your station among other things.
-The Beast is cursed to punish his mother.
-The book’s plot turns out to be entirely due to the machinations of The Mother of the Seasons and the long-game trap/revenge story orchestrated by the Nice Fairy to defeat The Mother of the Seasons Fairy.
-The book takes place in a specific time period rather than in a nebulous “before-time”, somewhere, as I figure, between 1669 to the early 1700s. It might even be contemporaneous to when it was published. It references the age piracy, revolutions, the merchant class, the presence of slavery, Belle watching comedies, operas, and plays the Fair of St. Germain, and a Janissary battle.
-The Beast’s Queen mother led troops into battle for several years, put down a revolt and defeated an encroaching enemy monarch.
And this is only a partial list.
If you’d like to read the original version by Madame de Villeneuve, it’s collected in a book by J. R. Blanche.
It’s available for free:
Archive.org (they don’t mention her name in the author list but it’s there)
Google Books

 I’ve uploaded a PDF of the Beauty and the Beast part on Google Drive.


Well, this is just deliciously cool. I’ve long thought that Beauty and the Beast was the most feminist of fairy tales. It’s gotten a terrible rap recently, but I suspect the fault lies in the adaptations. I mean, who doesn’t love a jerk fairy? Actually, it’s my new life goal to be a jerk fairy.
I’m sorely tempted to spend the rest of the day formatting and binding my own little copy.
Also, I desperately wish that was my illustration. Elephant heads are wonderful. 

missveryvery:

What You Don’t Know About Beauty and the Beast:

Some backstory: due to this little discussion, I was considering writing a continuation/expansion of Beauty and the Beast. I read up on it and found out everything I thought I knew about it was wrong.

-It was created by one, singular, female author in 1740: Madame Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve

-It is not a retelling of a pervasive folklore like Perrault’s Cinderella, for example. It was influenced by folklore but is an original story and is very “post” the fairy tales you might be familiar with. The story is also influenced by women who gathered together and told each other revisions of fairy tales in Parisian salons.

-It’s over 100 pages long

-Though written simply and in a straightforward manner, the characters have personalities and are much more complex in their emotions than a normal folkloric tale. They behave in a diverse and fairly realistic manner to their situations. The Beast’s mother in particular is a complex woman, protective of her son and a capable military leader but not progressive in her attitude towards marrying below your station.

-Women are overwhelmingly the masters of the plot and outnumber the men in number and priority.

Female players include:

  • Belle/Beauty

  • A nice Fairy

  • A jerk Fairy (called Mother of the Seasons)

  • The Queen of the Fairies

  • A Fairy-who-is-a-Queen (these are different)

  • A Queen/the Beast’s mother

  • Belle’s shallow (though fairly realistically so) sisters who are treated as a collective

-It contains considerable world-building. Fairy language, Fairy law, Fairy influence over monarchies, Fairy hierarchy, Fairy magic are all things she depicts. (eat your heart out, Tolkien fans).

-The curse is broken halfway through the book. The rest is devoted to comments on class, monarchy, marrying for love vs. status, appropriate conditions for love, and marrying below your station among other things.

-The Beast is cursed to punish his mother.

-The book’s plot turns out to be entirely due to the machinations of The Mother of the Seasons and the long-game trap/revenge story orchestrated by the Nice Fairy to defeat The Mother of the Seasons Fairy.

-The book takes place in a specific time period rather than in a nebulous “before-time”, somewhere, as I figure, between 1669 to the early 1700s. It might even be contemporaneous to when it was published. It references the age piracy, revolutions, the merchant class, the presence of slavery, Belle watching comedies, operas, and plays the Fair of St. Germain, and a Janissary battle.

-The Beast’s Queen mother led troops into battle for several years, put down a revolt and defeated an encroaching enemy monarch.

And this is only a partial list.

If you’d like to read the original version by Madame de Villeneuve, it’s collected in a book by J. R. Blanche.

It’s available for free:

Archive.org (they don’t mention her name in the author list but it’s there)

Google Books

I’ve uploaded a PDF of the Beauty and the Beast part on Google Drive.

Well, this is just deliciously cool. I’ve long thought that Beauty and the Beast was the most feminist of fairy tales. It’s gotten a terrible rap recently, but I suspect the fault lies in the adaptations. I mean, who doesn’t love a jerk fairy? Actually, it’s my new life goal to be a jerk fairy.

I’m sorely tempted to spend the rest of the day formatting and binding my own little copy.

Also, I desperately wish that was my illustration. Elephant heads are wonderful.